Caesars Palace in Las Vegas

Caesars Palace in Las Vegas

Research

I have started this page to list all the research I am looking into. I am not going to cover areas from the past but only moving forward from Sept. 5th. Please feel free to list areas of interest as well or make comments. Thank You- Sabin

Basilar Artery Thrombosis- Find more here http://www.neurologyindia.com/text.asp?2009/57/3/313/53291

Basilar artery thrombosis has high morbidity and mortality. Though intra-arterial thrombolytics have proven efficacy in the treatment of acute basilar artery occlusion, the elevation of procoagulant factors in the blood after intra-arterial thrombolysis could result in subsequent thrombus formation and clinical deterioration. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors have been shown to reduce this elevation in procoagulants. We present a pilot study of three cases of acute basilar artery occlusion treated with a combination of intra-arterial thrombolytics and Gp IIb/IIIa inhibitor with remarkable clinical recovery seen in all the patients.

Read more on the Basilar Artery and surrounding arteries here: http://www.answers.com/topic/basilar-artery

Spinal Cord Disorder- http://www.merck.com/mmpe/sec16/ch224/ch224a.html

Spinal cord dysfunction causes paresis, loss of sensation, reflex changes, and autonomic dysfunction (eg, bowel, bladder, and erectile dysfunction; loss of sweating). Dysfunction may be partial (incomplete). Autonomic and reflex abnormalities are usually the most objective signs of cord dysfunction; sensory abnormalities are the least objective.

Personal Note:

Adhesive in the vessel walls causes cholesterol to stick. If certain head movements or my head positions causes emboli to loosen and break off in the vertebral artery or in the circle of willis general region, that could kind of explain the stroke showers.

Definition of Dizziness

As a disorder, dizziness is classified into three categories—vertigo, syncope, and nonsyncope nonvertigo. Each category has a characteristic set of symptoms, all related to the sense of balance. In general, syncope is defined by a brief loss of consciousness (fainting) or by dimmed vision and feeling uncoordinated, confused, and lightheaded. Many people experience a sensation like syncope when they stand up too fast. Vertigo is the feeling that either the individual or the surroundings are spinning. This sensation is like being on a spinning amusement park ride. Individuals with nonsyncope nonvertigo dizziness feel as though they cannot keep their balance. This feeling may become worse with movement.

The cerebellum, which is responsible for coordination and the , provides neurological information to the brainstem. For example, the  is the organ that informs the body how to shift weight when going down a flight of stairs and how to balance on a bicycle. These processes are accomplished without conscious thinking.

In order to maintain balance, the brainstem depends on input from sensory organs including the eyes, muscles, joints, skin and ears. This information is relayed to the brainstem via the spinal cord. The combined neurological  system, which involves the brainstem, spinal cord, and sensory organs, is called the proprioceptive system. Proprioceptive dysfunction may result in dizziness, and people with problems with their proprioceptive system may fall often. Additionally, as people age, problems with become more common.

MURRAY FLASTER M.D.,Ph.D.

UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

2-05-09

INTERNAL MEDICINE RESIDENT’S CONFERENCE


ISCHEMIC STROKE ETIOLOGY IN THE YOUNG: A FLEA MARKET OF POSSIBILITIES


LARGE ARTERY ATHEROSCLEROSIS 2% (BELOW  AGE 30)

CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE

RHEUMATIC HEART DISEASE (AFIB)

INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS

NON-ISCHEMIC CARDIOMYOPATHY

CERVICAL (AND INTRACRANIAL) ARTERIAL DISSECTION 20%

ARTERIOSCLEROSIS

FIBROMUSCULAR DYSPLASIA

HEMATOLOGICAL DISEASE

MIGRAINOUS STROKE

HIV ASSOCIATED

OTHER INFECTIONS

DRUGS OF ABUSE

PARADOXIC EMBOLISM (PFO)

HYPERCOAGUABLE STATE

MALIGNANCY (OFTEN OCCULT)

INFECTIOUS AND AUTOIMMUNE VASCULITIS

REVERSIBLE CEREBRAL VASOCONSTRICTOR SYNDROMES

PRIMARY CNS VASCULITIS

RADIATION INDUCED VASCULOPATHIES

MOYA MOYA DISEASE

GENETIC DISORDERS (HYPERHOMOCYSTEINEMIAS, FABRY’S DISEASE)

CARDIAC TUMORS (ATRIAL MYXOMA)

CRYPTOGENIC (WE LOOKED HARD AND WE STILL DON’T KNOW.) 15-30%

Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstrictor Syndromes

Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes (RCVS) comprise a group of diverse conditions, all characterized by reversible multifocal narrowing of the cerebral arteries heralded by sudden (thunderclap), severe headaches with or without associated neurologic deficits. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes are clinically important because they affect young persons and can be complicated by ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes. The differential diagnosis of RCVS includes conditions associated with thunderclap headache and conditions that cause irreversible or progressive cerebral artery narrowing, such as intracranial atherosclerosis and cerebral vasculitis. Misdiagnosis as primary cerebral vasculitis and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is common because of overlapping clinical and angiographic features. However, unlike these more ominous conditions, RCVS is usually self-limited: Resolution of headaches and vasoconstriction occurs over a period of days to weeks. In this review, we describe our current understanding of RCVS; summarize its key clinical, laboratory, and imaging features; and discuss strategies for diagnostic evaluation and treatment.

Google this and you will find a ton of articles: REVERSIBLE CEREBRAL VASOCONSTRICTION SYNDROMES

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